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Introduction to the Maldives

Introduction to the Maldives

By Di Lechner

MALDIVES

“MARUHABAA” (welcome) to the sunny-side of life, where tiny islands resembling strings of pearls are scattered across iridescent turquoise lagoons.

I’m not usually one for clichés but when it comes to the Maldives, I find myself throwing them around at every opportunity! Unspoilt beaches, Aquamarine Lagoons, sugar white sands, swaying palm trees, world famous luxury resorts, and a vibrant underwater world, make Maldives the go to place for a pure escapism experience.

Honeymooners and couples seeking romance and privacy will love the Maldives, yet families will be equally thrilled with many resorts offering some of the most amazing facilities and activities for kids available.

Expect unsurpassed luxury, intuitive staff to cater to your every need, world-class facilities and incredible dining options all in the most stunning of settings in the middle of the Indian Ocean.

The ultimate island destination, the Maldives will take your breath away from the moment you arrive.

LOCATION

Laying South west of India and Sri Lanka, the Republic of Maldives is home to 1190 coral islands and sand banks.

The islands are often described as resembling strings of pearls scattered across the ocean. All islands are encircled by a stunning turquoise lagoon of the most perfect crystal clear water you’ll ever see.

The Maldives encompass 99% water and only 1% land and the Maldives waters are home to some of the most diverse and spectacular marine life imaginable.

Due to it’s location laying close to the Equator, the Maldives benefits from consistent warm temperatures year round.

GETTING THERE

Traveling to the Maldives is itself a wonderfully beautiful experience. You’ll be whisked away from the capital Malé airport straight to your resort in a luxury speedboat or yacht or a personal favourite of ATM’s, a seaplane ride, where your barefoot pilot and the controls are clearly visible from your seat and only adds to the adventure.

Seaplanes however, only fly during daylight hours so please keep this in mind when selecting your flights and resort.

If you’re flight arrives into Malé in the late afternoon or early evening, you may be required to spend your first night in Malé or at an airport hotel. Resorts that require a domestic flight or speedboat transfer are accessible at night. We can assist you in choosing the best option for you.

Flights to the Capital of the Maldives (Malé) Ibrahim Nasir airport are available from Australia via Singapore, Dubai, Hong Kong, Bangkok and Kuala Lumpur.

Direct flights from the UK are also available at certain times of the year. Addicted to Maldives can also assist you in arranging your International flights to the Maldives. 

Introduction to the Maldives

SPEND YOUR DAYS

Doing as much or as little as you like!

Scuba diving, snorkelling with the gentle giants of the ocean Manta Rays, indulging in fine dining in some of the most romantic places imaginable, private picnics on secluded sand banks, movie nights under the stars, spa treatments in underwater spas, luxurious villas on the beach, over water or in the treetops, or just simply lazing the days away in a hammock, are all perfectly acceptable ways to spend your days in the Maldives.

Seeking a little more action? Why not try kite surfing across the Indian Ocean, jet skiing through the waves or take in a birds eye view from a parasail above. Some resorts offer world-class tennis courts and golf courses too. The Maldivian’s are huge fans of soccer so you are bound to find a soccer field in the middle of the island somewhere at most resorts. Why not join the staff for a friendly match?

WHO SHOULD GO?

Who shouldn’t go would be a much a shorter list.

Everyone! Loved up couples, blissed out honeymooners, groups of friends and even families.. yes I said families should absolutely go to the Maldives.

WHEN TO GO

Anytime is a good time to go to the Maldives. With temperatures averaging 27-30 C, it’s the perfect holiday destination year round.

December to April is typically the peak dry season (northeast monsoon) where you can expect constant sunshine and blue skies, perfect for tanning and sipping cocktails.

The wet season (southwest monsoon) runs June to October but often the days still see plenty of sunshine with occasional rain fall or thunderstorms which usually pass quite quickly. It is quite beautiful to watch a storm rolling in over the Indian Ocean.

Traveling at this time of the year does have some benefits as you can often take advantage of reduced rates and special packages.

The wet season also offers the best time for water-sports addicts with perfect conditions for surfing the breaks or a spot of kite or windsurfing.

Dive Addicts will find the best conditions during December to April, when the skies are blue and the lack of wind offers calm waters and clear visibility.

LANGUAGE

The local language of the Maldives is Dhivehi however English is widely spoken in the Maldives and in all of the Luxury resorts available through Addicted to Maldives.

CURRENCY

The official currency of the Maldives is the Rufiyaa but US Dollars are the preferred currency all over the Maldives including the airport and resorts. When staying at the resorts, everything will be charged back to your room, so you may pay for any incidentals by credit card at the end of your stay. If you think you might like to tip, it might be a good idea to have some US dollars notes with you.

LOCAL TIME

GMT + 5, hours however many resorts operate on “Island time” which is one or two hours ahead of Malé depending on the resort you choose. The resorts do this to extend the number of daylight hours in each day, allowing you to soak up even more of the stunning Maldivian sunshine.

POWER / ELECTRICITY

Maldives uses 240 volt electricity supply and power plugs are the same as you’d find in the UK.

Want to know more?

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Web:             addictedtomaldives.com

Instagram:    @addictedtomaldives


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